Availability of all of the things – Michael Cade – Ep 60

Recently I wrote a blog post as part of a series that explored the importance of availability to a modern data platform, especially in a world were our reliance on technology is ever increasing, from the way we operate our business, to the way we live our lives and how the digitally focussed businesses can no longer tolerate downtime, planned or unplanned in the way they could even 5 years ago (you can read that post here).

So how do we mitigate against the evils of downtime? That’s simple, we build recovery and continuity plans to ensure that our system remain on regardless of the events that go on around it, from planned maintenance to the very much unplanned disaster. But there’s the problem, these things aren’t simple, are they?

I’ve recently worked on a project where we’ve been doing exactly this, building DR and continuity plans in the more “traditional” way, writing scripts, policies and procedures to ensure that in the event of some kind of disaster the systems could be recovered quickly and meet stringent recovery time and point objectives. What this project reminded me of is how difficult these things are, keeping your documentation up to date, making sure your scripts are followed and ensuring you can fully test these plans, is tricky.

With that in mind the recent product announcement from Veeam of their new Availability Orchestrator solution, caught my attention, a solution that promises to automate and orchestrate not only the delivery of a DR solution, but also automating its documentation and testing, this was something that I needed to understand more and thought I wouldn’t be the only one.

So that is the topic of this weeks podcast, as serial guest Michael Cade, Global Technologist at Veeam, joins me to provide an insight into Availability Orchestrator, what challenges it addresses, why Veeam thought it was important to develop and how it can help you deliver better availability to your critical systems.

During the show Michael shares some insight into understanding your availability gap and why today business cannot tolerate downtime of key systems as well as the difficulties that come with maintaining a robust and appropriate strategy.

We explore the challenges of testing when the business doesn’t want downtime, how to keep track of all of the little tricks that our tech team keep in their heads how to get that into a continuity plan.

We finish up looking at how Availability Orchestrator can help, by providing a automation and orchestration solution to automate testing, documentation and execution of our continuity plans and how it can also be a tool to help us build test and dev environments, as well as help us to migrate to cloud platforms like VMware on AWS.

Availability Orchestrator, in my opinion, is a very powerful tool, having just worked on a continuity and DR project, the challenges that come with manually maintaining these plans are still very fresh in my mind and had this tool been available when I started that project it would certainly of been worthy of investigation into how it could help.

If you want to find out more about Veeam availability orchestrator, check out the Veeam Website.

You can follow Michael on twitter @MichaelCade1

And if you’d like to read his blog series on Veeam replication you’ll find that on his blog site starting here.

Hope you’ve found the show useful.

Thanks for listening.


Managing the future – Dave Sobel – Ep59

As our IT systems become ever more complex, with more data, devices and ways of working, the demands on our systems and ensuring they are always operating efficiently grow. This in turn presents us and our IT teams with a whole new range of management challenges.

Systems management has always been a challenge for organisations, how do we keep on top of an ever-increasing amount of systems ? how do we ensure they remain secure and patched ? and how do we cope with our users and their multitude of devices and ensure we can effectively look after them?.

Like most of our technology, systems management is changing, but how? And what should we expect from future management solutions?

That’s the subject of this weeks podcast, as I’m joined by returning guest Dave Sobel. Dave is Senior Director of Community at SolarWinds MSP, working with SolarWinds partners and customers to ensure they deliver a great service.

As part of this role, Dave is also charged with looking at the future (not the distant future, but the near future of the next 2 years) of systems management and what these platforms need to include in them to continue to be relevant and useful.

Dave provides some excellent insight into the way the management market is shifting and some of the technology trends that will change and improve the way we control our ever more complex yet crucial IT systems.

We start by asking why looking at the future is such an important part of the IT strategists role, whether you are a CIO, IT Director, or any person who makes technology direction strategy decisions, if you are not taking a look at future trends, it will seriously limit your ability to make good technology decisions.

We see why we need to rethink how we see a “computer” and how this is leading to a proliferation of different devices with the emergence of Internet of Things (IoT) as well as looking at why that is such a horrible phrase and how this is affecting our ability to manage.

We discuss the part Artificial Intelligence is going to play in future systems management as we try to supplement our over stretched IT staff and provide them with ways of analysing ever more data and turning it into something useful.

We also investigate increased automation, looking at how our management systems can be more flexible in supporting new devices as they are added to our systems, as well as been smarter in the way we can apply management to all of our devices.

Finally, we look at the move to human centric management, instead of our systems been built to support devices, we need to be able to understand the person who uses the technology, and build our management and controls around them, allowing us to provide them with better management and importantly a better technology experience.

We wrap up looking at how smarter systems management is going to allow us to free our IT teams to provide increased value to the business, as well as looking at a couple of areas you can focus on today, to start to look at the way you manage your systems.

To find more from Dave you can follow him on twitter @djdaveet

You will find Dave’s Blog is here

I hope you found the chat as interesting as I did.

Until next time, thanks for listening.

Straight as an Arrow – David Fearne & Richard Holmes – Ep58

If there is one thing that we can say is a certainty in the technology industry it is the constant state of change, how technology works, how we want to use it, where we want to use it and what we expect from it is constantly changing and in reality is ever more demanding.

For those of us who work in technology, either as IT pro’s or IT decision makers, this presents its own challenges, when we are planning our IT strategy how do we know where to focus, what technology bets should we be taking and what trends are others taking advantage of that we could bring into our organisation to help us to improve our services.

One of the things I like to do in my role is spend time looking at technology predictions and listen to ideas from those in the industry tasked with defining the strategic direction of their businesses, not to judge whether they are right or wrong (predicting things in this industry is so very difficult) but to pick out trends and areas that are of interest to the work I do and then at least be aware of it and keep a watching brief on how it develops.

Keeping a watching brief gave me the idea for this week’s podcast as I catch up with two guests who produce an annual technology predictions blog and back that up with episodes on their own successful podcast where they look in more detail at those predictions.

David Fearne and Richard Holmes work for Arrow ECS, a global technology supplier and one of the worlds largest companies. David is Technical Director, charged with looking after the relationship and developing strategy for over 100 different technology partners and suppliers. Richard is Business Development Director for Arrow’s Internet Of Things (IoT) business. The gents also present the excellent Arrow Bandwidth podcast.

This week we look at their predictions from 2017, not to review whether they have been successful, but rather to focus on just a few areas of particular interest and look at how those areas have developed over the last 12 months and how we expect they will continue to shift.

We start by discussing data management and the concept of “data divorce” and why in a rapidly changing landscape how we look after our data will become increasingly important. We also look at how, in a world that is removing barriers to our ability to collect more and more data, how we manage that and importantly how we only collect things that are relevant and of use to us and our organisations.

The second area we explore is data analytics and how do we build into our businesses the ability to make data driven decisions. We discuss the fact that all businesses make decisions based on data, however, how do we remove our human inefficiencies and more importantly bias when we look at data, how many of us make decisions based on someone’s “version of the truth”?

We also investigate the inhibitors to more of us embracing data analytics capabilities, capabilities that are increasingly available to us particularly via providers like Microsoft, AWS and Google, the challenge isn’t a technology one, but more about how we get those tools into the hands of the right people and empower them.

We wrap up looking at security and David’s assertion of a change in “security posture” and how it’s crucial that we rethink the way we look at security of our systems. We discuss why “assuming breach” is an important part of that change. We look at, as the security problem becomes ever more complex, how do we continue to address it, is the answer to employ ever more security specialists?

We wrap up by discussing how each of these areas have a common thread running through them and how as technology strategists it is important that, when making technology decisions, we don’t focus on technology but fully understand the business outcomes we are trying to achieve.

It’s a great chat with David and Richard and we could have discussed these trends for hours, luckily for you, it’s only 40 minutes!

Enjoy the Show.

You’ll find David and Richards full list of prediction from 2017 here – https://www.arrowthehub.co.uk/blog/posts/2017/february/what-are-the-hottest-technology-trends-of-2017-part-1/

You’ll also find the 2018 predictions here https://www.arrowthehub.co.uk/blog/posts/2018/january/what-are-the-hottest-technology-trends-for-2018-part-1/

If you’d rather listen, then check out the excellent Arrow Bandwidth podcast you can find the episodes discussing all of last years predictions as well as this years in the following places Tech Trends 2017 Part One, Tech Trends 2017 Part Two, Tech Trends 2018 Part One, Tech Trends 2018 Part Two.

If you’d like to keep up with David and Richard, you can find them both on twitter @davidfearne and @_Rich_Holmes.

Thanks for listening.

IT Pro’s and the Tech Community – Yadin Porter de Leon – Ep 57

One of the favourite parts of my role over the last few years has been my involvement in tech community, whether that’s been working with advocacy groups like the NetApp A-Team, with local user groups like TechUG, presenting at a range of different community events or just answering questions in technical communities, all of these investments (and they are investments) have paid back, they’ve introduced me to great people, given me access to resources and expertise I would never have found normally and opened up great opportunities for travel and too develop some great friendships.

We are fortunate to be part of an industry that does have a strong sense of community, full of people with shared interests and a passion for their subject, a passion they are often happy to share with anyone who’s interested.

One of the challenges with tech community is however its size and if you are new to it or even a part of it, it can be overwhelming and hard to know where to start? How do you find the resources you need, find out which events you can attend or find out who the leaders are that you can engage with?

071517_1725_Livingonthe1.jpgLast year I was invited to get involved in a project called “Level Up”, a project started by this week’s guest on the podcast Yadin Porter de Leon, Yadin has been on the show before in his capacity at data protection company Druva, however that’s not what we discuss this week as we chat about the Level Up project, why he started it, the project aims and how it can help you in your career.

In this week’s episode we discuss why you may want to get involved in community and what benefits it can bring and how involvement in the wider community can benefit both you and your business providing you with opportunities to develop your skills.

Yadin shares how one of the focuses of the project is to engage those who are not already involved in community and provide them a way to get started.

We look at Level Up’s first project the vTrail Map a fantastic guide to the world of VMware and the virtualisation community and we also look ahead to what’s next for the project and the longer terms aims.

We wrap up by asking Yadin about another project he is involved in which is the excellent Tech Village Podcast, again focussed on career development and the technology business, a great show which I’d recommend anyone gets on their regular podcast list you can find the show on Soundcloud and follow the show on twitter @TechVillagePod

For more information on Level Up, you can find them on twitter @Tech_LevelUp

You can also contact Yadin on twitter @porterdeleon

Hope you find the show interesting and if you’re not already involved in tech community maybe this will give you a bit of inspiration to involve yourself more, it’s most definitely worth it.

Thanks for listening.

Turning Up The Amp On Your Data – Matt Watts – Ep56

Wanting to get the very best from your data and “extracting value” from it seems to be a constant conversation with technology and business leaders in pretty much any organisation, but what does getting value from it mean and how do we go about it?

A couple of weeks ago I read a very interesting article from this weeks guest where he introduced the concept of Data Amplification Ratio, the basic premise of this article was that one of the key ways to get more from your data is to ensure that the datasets you have can be presented to multiple different systems and services all of which can add their own particular value and extract their own unique information from the data presented to them (you can read the whole article here What is your data amplification ratio?). I thought this article presented a really good insight in to the practicalities of getting the most from our data and wanted to get the author to share that insight for the Tech Interviews listeners.

032617_2030_TheFutureis1.jpgThat’s exactly what we do this week, as I’m joined by Matt Watts, Director Technology and Strategy for Data Management company NetApp, to explore more this idea of Data Amplification, what it means and what it could mean for those can take advantage of their data to deliver new services, opportunities and value.

We explore the wide range of ideas that Matt covered in his article in a little more depth. We start by exploring what is a “Data Amplification Ratio” and why it’s important to focus on the right things if we want to make the most from our data.

We discuss the line between what are underlying storage “table stakes” versus what are things that can allow us to do more with our data assets. We look at how the secret to unlocking your data is having the flexibility to present it to numerous different systems, services or people who can gain insight and information from it.

We also examine the idea of how a technical chat still has a place in a world where increasingly our technology investments are about delivering business outcomes and not about the technology itself. Matt also discusses the concept of a “data fabric” and how data mobility is going to be a crucial for getting the very best from the data you have.

There is also a bit of Tech Interviews controversy as Matt shares his view on why one of the tech industries favourite phrases “data is the new oil” may not actually be true!

We wrap up by looking at what’s next for data amplification and how frequency and speed is the next challenge to overcome.

Matt as always shares some fantastic insights on the data industry and its direction.

To find out more from Matt you can read his latest article at watts-innovating.com and find him on twitter @mtjwatts

If you enjoyed the show, then why not subscribe, you’ll find Tech Interviews in all of the usual places.

Until next time, thanks for listening.

Hybrid Cloud It’s Just Like Lego – John Woodall – Ep55

As organisations we can see the benefit of cloud and almost all organisations are taking advantage of it, be it a software service such as Office365 or backup and DR, the efficiency and simplicity of deployment of these kinds of services make them an attractive option.

However, what we are not seeing, in general, is organisations moving 100% to a cloud-based IT infrastructure, this can be for many reasons, for example, suitability, complexity or cost.

But our desire to take advantage of cloud services is not going to diminish, especially as we look at how we start to get the best from our data with analytics, business intelligence and machine learning, often the only practical way to access these services is via cloud.

With all this in mind we will see increasing numbers of organisations want to deploy a hybrid IT model, using cloud where appropriate and on-premises infrastructure as needed. If we are deploying a hybrid infrastructure, what does that mean to us and what do we need to consider when we are designing our IT services and importantly preparing our data assets to operate in this hybrid world?

Recently I watched a video prepared by storage vendor NetApp called “What it takes to get your data hybrid cloud ready” in which John Woodall, VP Engineering at Integrated Archive Systems, provided insights on how to prepare your data and infrastructure to operate effectively in a hybrid world.

John covered some great information and I thought exploring in more detail the points he raises in the short video would make an interesting Tech Interviews episode, so that’s exactly what I’ve done.

This week John joins the show to discuss and share his experience on how to prepare your IT infrastructure to operate in a hybrid environment.

We start our chat by looking at what we mean by hybrid cloud and the importance that it plays in a modern businesses IT strategy.

We also explore the challenges that come with building a hybrid model and why it’s crucial we don’t lose sight of who is responsible for the data that we share with any cloud service provider, remember IT’S YOUR DATA.

We talk about the joys of finances and why if you are thinking cloud is going to be a money saver, you maybe looking at this in the wrong way. We also discuss the importance, before we head off on our cloud adventure, of fully appreciating exactly where we are right now.

John also shares some of the basics you need to get in place to not only ensure you get your strategy right, but that you can deploy something that is consistent, secure and extensible. We also get to talk about Lego and Minecraft!

We wrap up with looking at why you may want to consider hybrid, whether you are a traditional business with lots of on-prem IT or even if you are a “born in the cloud” company who until now has delivered everything via the cloud, why you may want to bring some of that on-premises.

John has a real enthusiasm for deploying technology and helping customers get the best from their investment and he shares that in this episode, if you want to find out more from John or about Integrated Archive Systems then you can in the following ways;

Follow John on Twitter @John_Woodall

Check out his company website at www.iarchive.com

Hope you enjoyed the show, until next time, thanks for listening.


Imagine if the data you shared was written in pencil! – Val Bercovici – Ep54

One of my favourite phrases is that “those who make the most of their data, will be the success stories of the future” and I think that is echoed by our obsession with data as a new all-powerful resource for us to mine and exploit.

But, it’s not quite that straightforward is it? There is no getting away from the importance of security and privacy when it comes to our data. Be that keeping it from unwarranted access, data leakage or maintaining compliance with ever increasing regulatory requirements, maintaining our data in a secure environment is a primary concern.

Within that battle between wanting to exploit our data while maintaining control lies a huge problem, how do you share your data, so you can extract value, while maintaining control, security and privacy over this crucial asset?

That is the focus of this weeks show, as I’m joined by Val Bercovici, a well-respected technology leader, who is today working on a new project with his start-up company Pencildata, a company who’s mission it is to try to address this very challenge and provide a solution that allows us to both get value from our data, while maintaining control, regardless of where it is, who is accessing it and however many services it gets passed on to.

In a fascinating chat with Val, we explore the growing tension between getting value from data while maintaining its security. We examine some of the interesting problems that come with A.I. systems, how do you address the “cold start” problem? or ensure that your A.I. systems have a wider range of data, beyond academic and publicly available data sets to learn from?

We discuss why organisations find it hard to unlock the value of their data and effectively share it, not only with 3rd party providers but even with others inside their organisations.

We wrap up by looking at how to change this, how do we give an organisation the ability to maintain control of their data regardless of where it is shared and crucially the ability to change their minds, so when they no longer want to share that data they can withdraw authorisation, regardless of where that data resides. We also look at the importance of an immutable audit trail so that you always know who, where and how your data is used.

I hope you enjoyed the episode of what is a very interesting topic, as I do believe the ability to maintain this level of control of data as it moves between departments, or is shared with external services is going to be crucial as we look to fully exploit the value and insight that is held within our data sets.

If you want to know more about the work Val and the team at Pencildata you can find them at www.pencildata.com.

You can follow them on twitter @Pencil_DATA or email Val valb@pencildata.com.

You can also follow Val on twitter @valb00

Thanks for listening.

Keep it to yourself, the data privacy challenge – Sheila Fitzpatrick – Ep53

There is no doubt for many 2018 will be the year of data privacy, driven, in no small part, by the impending EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

In my opinion GDPR has many positives elements to it, it’s the opportunity for businesses to look at how they manage, secure and retain the privacy of data across their organisations and for too many of us, this is something that’s long overdue.

GDPR (and other regulations) however are not just a good idea, they are something that we need to comply with and May 25th 2018 is the date when GDPR becomes enforceable.

With that in mind, what are some of the changes that we should expect? what things are no longer going to acceptable practice? and what are the things really that we should have in place by that date?

022617_1150_Besttakecar1.jpgThis week we look at exactly that topic as I’m joined by data privacy expert and attorney Sheila FitzPatrick, founder of FitzPatrick and Associates and a globally recognised data privacy expert with over 35 years’ experience in the data privacy field.

Who better then to ask and get some advice from on some of the pitfalls and common misconceptions of data privacy and, when it comes to GDPR,  what are some of the basics that we really need to have in place by May 25th 2018.

During this episode we discuss a range of issues, we look at where we should start and why that place really shouldn’t be technology, Sheila also touches on why it’s important to be weary of “GDPR” experts selling you their compliance technology.

We discuss some of the common misconceptions and mistakes that organisations are making in their business compliance work and how this often leads to companies spending a lot of money unnecessarily, we also look at why focusing on GDPR alone can be a big problem in itself.

Sheila also explains why security is not the answer to data privacy and why it’s important to make sure you understand exactly why you have the data in the first place, before you worry about “securing” it.

We explore where to start on your compliance journey by understanding your current policies and procedures and what they are based upon, are those procedures clear and transparent and then the importance of GAP analysis, so you can understand what work is needed to meet the requirements of GDPR, or any other relevant privacy regulations to your organisation.

To wrap up we look at the things organisations are currently doing with their data that come May 26th 2018 will no longer be acceptable and why it will be crucial to ensure your business compliance plans are fluid and capable of responding to the ever changing data landscape, May 25th is most certainly not an end date for GDPR.

Lastly, I ask Sheila whether she has advice for those that think GDPR won’t affect them and she does!

Sheila, as always, shares some great insights into the world of data privacy and compliance and does so with her usual enthusiasm for the topic.

If you want to hear more from Sheila on these subjects, Sheila has appeared on Tech Interviews a number of times before and those episodes can be found here;

Best Take Care Of Those Crown Jewels – Sheila Fitzpatrick – Ep 17

Don’t Build Your Data Privacy House Upside Down – Sheila Fitzpatrick – Ep 18

Myself and Sheila also recently appeared on The Cube discussing GDPR and data privacy, you can find that show here https://www.thecube.net/netapp-insight-berlin-2017/content/Videos/t3wRSr6LDJbTY6rAD

If you want to contact Sheila on line you can find her on twitter @sheilafitzp.

You can contact here via her Linkedin profile or email sfitzpat@hrglobal.com.

Looking forward and looking back – Chris Evans – Ep 52

It’s the kind of thing us podcasters like to do this time of year, we like to take a bit of a retrospective view of the previous year as well as a look forward to the new, so not wanting to miss a trick on the Tech Interviews podcast, that’s exactly what we do in this episode.

Chris M EvansTo help me to look forward and look back at the tech industry I’m joined by Analyst Chris Evans (@chrismevans), Chris has over 25 years of varied IT experience, starting his career on mainframes, Chris also successfully built and floated his own dotcom business, started his own consultancy practice and today is a widely read and respected industry analyst and hosts his own (excellent) podcast, Storage Unpacked.

With that background he’s the ideal person to provide some perspective and thoughts on the direction of the tech industry, especially the data and storage elements of it, so that is exactly what I ask him to do.

We take a look at a whole range of topics, we discuss how a move to a more software defined future has not stopped the re-emergence of the importance of hardware, with technologies such as NVMe becoming more prevalent and how the ever-increasing criticality of data and performance is driving this hardware evolution.

Chris also explores some thoughts around the development of hybrid cloud infrastructure and how this is not only driven by the traditional on-prem vendors, but by the big cloud providers, how the likes of Microsoft and AWS are investing increasingly in technology to help their customers simplify the process of moving data into their cloud platforms. (For example Chris references Microsoft’s purchase of Avere Systems, you can read more here).

We also ask why some of the technologies we expected to really take off didn’t, for example why a personal favourite of both myself and Chris, Object Storage, hasn’t quite captured the market as we thought.

We don’t of course just look back, we look at some of the technologies that we expect to be the big bets for CIO’s and IT decision makers in 2018.

We investigate why high performance and scale out file systems, both on-prem and in the cloud, will continue to grow and as we increasingly look at how to keep our data at the edge while taking advantage of cloud computing.

Will NVMe really take off in 2018? we discuss some potential use cases and why, if you are making those tech investment decisions in 2018, NVMe maybe for you.

Of course, we round up with a look at data privacy, no doubt 2018, at least the first half, will be the year of GDPR, Chris gives some thoughts on what technology can help and how the technology industry can be more helpful in the way it approaches this challenging topic.

To find out more from Chris, you can find him on twitter @chrismevans and Linkedin.

His writing and analysis can be found at https://blog.architecting.it/

And if you are interested in storage industry related content, then I strongly recommend Chris’s excellent Storage Unpacked podcast you can listen to that here http://storageunpacked.com/.

Next week, sticking with the theme of data privacy as the topic for 2018, I’m joined by my favourite data privacy guru Sheila Fitzpatrick as we look at the upcoming impact of GDPR, the Myths and the areas you should be focussing on ahead of May 25th.

To ensure you catch that show, why not subscribe, you’ll find the show in all of the usual places.

Thanks for listening and have a great 2018.

Architecting the Future – Ruairi McBride and Jason Benedicic – Ep 51

As we become more data-driven in our organisations and ever more used to the way big public cloud providers deliver our services, it is putting more pressure on internal IT to deliver infrastructure that provides this data focussed, cloud like experience, but where do you start in designing this next-generation of datacentre?

That’s the subject of this week’s podcast, the last of the shows recorded at NetApp Insight in Berlin, where I catch up with two members of a fascinating panel discussion I attended at the event, Ruairi McBride and Jason Benedicic.

082917_1433_ITAvengersP3.jpgRuairi is focussed on partner education for global technology distribution company Arrow ECS and has spent the last 9 months working with partners to help them to understand next-generation datacenters.

You can find Ruairi on twitter @mcbride_ruairi and his blog site ruairimcbride.wordpress.com

Jason is a principal consultant at ANS Group in the UK with a focus on next-082917_1433_ITAvengersP4.jpggeneration datacentres, Jason spends his time designing and implementing next-gen technology for a wide range of customers and with nearly 20 years of industry experience offers great insight and experience.

Catch up with Jason on twitter @jabenedicic and look out for his coming soon blog site www.thedatacentrebrit.co.uk.

Ruairi and Jason were part of a panel hosted by the NetApp A-Team which consisted of people who were not theorists but had practical experience of deploying next-generation technologies and working practices and as I know many listeners to this show are involved in developing their own next-generation strategy, I thought it would make an interesting episode.

We cover a range of topics and begin by looking to define what we mean by next-gen the types of technology and methodologies involved.

We discuss what is driving the move to next-generation datacentres, how public cloud and the move to automated, self-healing, self-service, software defined infrastructure is a major influence and how businesses who wish to maintain a competitive edge and improve the service to their customers and users, need to look at this next generation approach.

We wrap up by looking at how next gen datacenters are not about technology alone and is as much about philosophy and working practice, while Jason and Ruairi share ideas about the type of building blocks you need and the help and support that the technology community can bring as you look to deliver a next generation strategy to your organisation.

Jason and Ruairi provide some excellent insights and tips on developing a next generation datacentre approach if you have questions then please feel free to contact any of us by twitter or via the comments section on the site.

This is the last show of 2017, for all who have listened this year, thanks for your support and Tech Interviews will be back in the new year with a whole host of new interviews exploring a range of technology topics, if you have anything you’d like the show to explore in 2018, then why not drop me a note @techstringy.

To make sure you catch next years shows then why not subscribe in all of the usual places.

Just leaves me to say, enjoy the Christmas holiday season and I’d like to wish you the very best for 2018 and hope you’ll spend some of it listening to Tech Interviews .

For all of you who have enjoyed the show in 2017 – thanks for listening