Cloud evolution or revolution? – W. Curtis Preston – Ep79

As we adopt an ever-increasing amount of cloud services into our businesses, are we part of a technology revolution or is it just the next evolutionary step in the way we do things? There is no doubt that cloud has revolutionised some businesses and that some would not exist without the incredible amount of services and innovation that the public cloud, in particular, can offer to us. However, that’s not the case for everyone, for those whose businesses pre-date “The Cloud”, we have legacy systems, “traditional” approaches to doing things and systems that are not architected like cloud applications.

So, what does that mean to us as we adopt cloud services? Especially when it comes to those “boring” topics such as data protection of our cloud integrated systems?

curtis preston newThat’s the topic I explore with this week’s guest “Mr Backup” also known as W. Curtis Preston, Curtis is Chief Technical Architect at Druva and has worked in the data protection space for 25 years.

We start out by discussing this evolution, from Terminals in datacentres to running our sensitive data “on someone else’s computer”, we look at what this means for data protection and clarify the position most cloud providers take when it comes to responsibility.

Curtis then shares some experience of what cloud data protection means and how we need to rethink our approach, as our on-prem methods do not necessarily translate to the cloud, in fact, if we are protecting “cloud native” then we need to think “cloud native” protection approaches.

We look at Druva’s approach to the problem and the power that comes with getting all of our data, regardless of location into a single repository and how that opens up options for getting insight and intelligence about the data we hold.

We also share some thoughts on the future and how the continued move to the cloud is going to break our on-prem data protection approaches if we don’t properly consider the way we protect our cloud-hosted information.

Finally, we dip into a topic we covered in the last episode as we look at VMware cloud on AWS, what that means for VMware customers and their transition to the cloud and of course the importance of protecting that data. If you are heading out to VMworld you will find Curtis In Barcelona discussing “The New Era of Cloud Data Management” why not look up his session.

If you want more information on what Druva are doing in this space visit Druva.com you can also follow them on twitter @druvainc and you can follow Curtis @wcpreston.

Great information from Curtis, hope you enjoy the show.

Next week we start a series of shows from my recent conference travels, with a large range of topics from data protection at scale to automation, ultra-fast performance to AI, If you want to ensure you don’t miss those shows you can subscribe and leave a review to help others find it.

Thanks for listening.

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NetApp’s Future, do they matter?

A couple of weeks ago I was at a technology event speaking with some of the attendees when the subject of NetApp was raised, accompanied by the question “Are NetApp still relevant?” I was taken a back by this, particularly as over the last few years I felt NetApp had done a great job in re-positioning themselves and changing the view of them as a “traditional” storage company.

However, this message had clearly not reached everyone and made me consider “Does NetApp’s vision really deal with challenges that are relevant to the modern enterprise?” and “have they done enough to shake the traditional storage vendor label?”.

I’m writing this blog 33000 ft above the United States, heading home from NetApp’s Insight conference. Reflecting on the three days in Las Vegas, I wondered, did what I hear answer those questions? and would it keep NetApp relevant for a long time to come?

#DataDriven

The modern tech conference loves a hashtag, one that attempts to capture the theme of the event and #DataDriven was Insight 2018’s entry to the conference hashtag dictionary.

But what does  Data Driven actually mean?

Data plays a significant role in driving modern business outcomes and the way we handle, store and extract information from it, is a keen focus for many of us and this is clearly the same for NetApp.

Throughout Insight,  NetApp stated clearly their vision for the future is to be a data company not a storage one, a subtle but crucial difference. No longer are speeds and feeds (while still important) the thing that drives their decision making, it is Data that is at the heart of NetApp’s strategy, a crucial shift that matches how the majority of NetApp’s customers think.

Data Fabric 2.0

NetApp’s data fabric over the last 4 years has been at the centre of their thinking. Insight however, presented a fundamental shift in how they see the future of data fabric, starting with making it clear it is not “NetApp’s Data Fabric” but “your data fabric”.

A fabric shouldn’t be “owned” by a storage vendor, it is ours to build to meet our own needs. This shift is also driving how NetApp see the future delivery of a data fabric, no longer something that needs building, but “Data Fabric as a Service” a cloud powered set of tools and services that enable your strategy. This is a 180° turn for this approach making it no longer an on-prem infrastructure that integrates cloud services, but a cloud service that integrates and orchestrates all of your data end points regardless of location.

The demonstration of this vision was extremely impressive, the future data fabric was clear in its direction, a fabric is yours, to be consumed as you need it, helping us to deliver services and data as and when we need to, quickly, efficiently and at scale.

The awkward HCI Conversation

Perhaps the most immediate beneficiary of this shift is NetApp’s Hyper Converged Infrastructure (HCI) platform. NetApp are by no means early in this market and in some quarters there is debate as to whether NetApp HCI is a Hyper Converged platform at all. I’ll admit, while the industry definition of HCI doesn’t really bother me, as technology decisions should be about outcomes not arbitrary definitions, I do have reservations about the long term future of NetApp’s HCI platform.

However, what NetApp showed as part of their future Data Fabric vision was a redefinition of how they see HCI, redefined to the extent that NetApp’s view of HCI is no longer hyper converged but Hybrid Cloud Infrastructure.

What does this mean?

It’s about bringing the cloud “experience” into your datacentre, but this is much more than building a “private cloud” it is about HCI becoming a fully integrated part of a cloud enabled data strategy. Allowing organisations to deploy services and enable the simple movement of them from public cloud to on-prem and back again, making HCI just an end point, a location from which your cloud services could be delivered.

Ultimately HCI shouldn’t be about hardware or software, but outcomes and NetApp’s aim is to allow this technology to speed up your ability to drive those outcomes, regardless of location.

This transformed in my mind a platform from one that I struggled to see its long-term value to something that has the potential to become a critical component in delivering modern services to organisations of all types.

Summary

Did what I hear address the questions raised to me? Would it convince a wider audience that NetApp remain relevant? For that we will have to wait and see.

However, In my opinion NetApp presented a forward thinking, relevant strategy that if executed properly is going to be a fundamental shift in the way they are developing as a company and will ensure they remain relevant to organisations by solving real and complex business challenges.

I’m very interested to see how this new vision for Data Fabric evolves and if they can execute the vision presented so impressively at Insight, they may finally shed that “traditional” NetApp label and become the data authority company that they are aiming to be.

You can get further details on announcements from Insight by visiting the NetApp Insight site and where you will find a wide range of videos including the two general session keynotes.

If you want to find out more about NetApp’s vision for your self, then it’s not to late to register to attend NetApp’s Insight EMEA conference in Barcelona, details are here.

Stay Cloudy VMware – Glenn Sizemore – Ep78

As I’ve discussed many times in both blogs and podcasts, the move to public cloud comes with its challenges, sometimes it’s poor decision making, poor design or it’s just too complicated to integrate the flexibility and power of public cloud with your on-prem environment. However, you are probably also aware that this is beginning too change as more tech vendors look at ways of simplifying this by offering consistency and tooling to both ease the move to public cloud and simplify the integration with on-prem tech.

One such solution was announced by VMware at 2017’s VMworld conference and that was their partnership with Amazon Web Services (AWS) that allowed you to take a VMware stack inside of AWS that is completely yours, not shared, running your own environment, on top of Amazon hardware and managed completely by VMware. Delivering consistency of end point by providing and integrating with the VMware environment in your datacentre to deliver a seamless hybrid experience.

As with all things in the cloud these services continue to evolve and develop, so 12 months in I wanted to follow up on VMware Cloud on AWS (VMC) to see how it has changed, the lessons VMware have learned and what is coming in the near future to allow even more flexibility and tighter integration with your own on-prem enterprise technology.

Joining me to discuss this is Glenn Sizemore, Glenn is a Senior Technical Marketing Architect at VMware with a long and varied experience in the IT industry.

On this episode, Glenn shares a range of updates on what VMC is and where it’s heading, we talk about the importance of its hybrid design allowing customers to focus on workloads and not have to focus on complex infrastructure, simplifying cloud adoption for a range of enterprises.

We also look at how it goes beyond just simplifying the move to the cloud as the two-way relationship with AWS starts to offer the ability to move native Amazon services into your datacentre and we discuss how this is driving a different cloud strategy conversation.

Glenn also shares some plans for what we can expect to see in VMC especially when it comes to storage as VMware look to tackle both the needs of capacity intensive workloads as well as the need to offer integrations with 3rd party storage platforms, which will be crucial in ensuring VMC is a flexible enterprise platform and not one that is seen as a tool just to sell VMware technologies.

We finish up by discussing how you can start to build both proof of concepts and proof of value with VMC before you make a commitment, because it’s crucial to define outcomes with this platform, understand that the platform is right, before asking whether “you can afford it”.

To find out more you can check out the Virtual Blocks blog site as well as follow Glenn on twitter @glnsize.

Also, do check out these fascinating Tech Field Day presentations that Glenn did alongside NetApp.

If you want to pop back in time to hear our intro show to VMware cloud on AWS from last year, you can find that here.

Glenn provides some great insight into this interesting platform, enjoy the show.

Thanks for listening.

Building a modern data platform – what have we learned?

As I reach the end of this series, it raises the question “what have we learned?”. If you’ve read through it all, you’ve learned you are patient and I’ve learned that writing a series of posts actually takes quite a bit of time. But I digress!

Let’s start at the beginning – what is a modern data platform?

I’ve used the term throughout, but what does it mean? In the introductory post I stated “In today’s modern world however, storing our data is no longer enough, we need to consider much more” and that’s true as organisations now want their data to provide modern data platformcompetitive edge and insights, we also need to ensure we are “developing an appropriate data strategy and building a data platform that is fit for today’s business needs”. In essence those two areas neatly define a modern data platform, storing data is no longer enough and our platform needs to fit today’s rapidly changing demands, integrate with new technologies and give the scale and flexibility we need to turn our data into an asset, all of this while ensuring our data maintains its privacy, security and we maintain governance and control

It’s not storage

While storage plays an important part in any data strategy (our data has to live somewhere) it’s important to realise when we talk about a data platform, it’s not about storage, while the right storage partner plays a crucial part, the choice isn’t driven by media types, IOPS, or colour of bezel, it’s about a wider strategy and ensuring our technology choice enables us to provide the scale, flexibility and security a modern platform demands.

Break down walls

We have also learned that data cannot be stored in silo’s, be that an on-prem storage repository or its modern equivalent the “cloud silo” placing our data somewhere without consideration of how we move it so we can do what we need to with it quickly and easily, is not designing a modern data platform.

Data Insight is crucial

Where our data is held and on what, while important, pales when compared to the managing the futureimportance of insight into how our data is used. Our modern data platform must provide visibility into the who’s, where’s, when’s, what’s and why’s of data usage, who’s accessing it, where is it and when, if ever, are they accessing it, what are they accessing and why. Knowing this, is critical for a modern data platform, it allows us to build retention, security and compliance policies, it allows us to start to build effective data leak protections and be more efficient with our storage and control the costs and challenges that comes with our ever increasing reliance on data.

Without this insight you don’t have a modern data platform.

Data is everywhere

We have also learned that our data is everywhere, it no longer resides in the protected walls of our data centers, it’s living on a range of devices both sat inside and outside of those walls. That’s not just the data we have, it’s also the increasing range of devices creating data for us, our platform needs to be able to ingest, process and control all of it. Protecting data on the very edges of our network to the same degree that we protect, secure and govern that which sits inside our data centers is crucial.

Cloud, cloud and more cloud

Just a few years ago the prognosis for the data industry was that cloud was going to swallow it all and those who looked to use “traditional” thinking around data would be swept away by the cloud driven tide.

080118_0950_Optimisingt1.jpgNow while cloud is unlikely to wipe out all data life as we know it, cloud should certainly play a part in your data strategy, it has many of the attributes that make it an ideal repository, its flexibility, scale, even commercial models make it an attractive proposition.

But it has limits, however ensuring our data platform can integrate cloud where appropriate and maintain all of the enterprise control we need is a core part of a modern platform, you can’t design a modern platform without considering cloud.

It’s a platform

The reason I used the word platform, is because that is what it is, it’s not one component, it is built up of multiple components, as I’ve shown here, it’s storage, data management, governance, control, be it in the datacentre, on the edges of your network or utilising the cloud.

The days of our data just been about one element are gone, we need a strategy that looks at how we use data in its entirety.

Building a modern data platform

The point of this series has been to provide some practical examples of the tools and technologies I’ve used building modern data platforms. Not every platform uses all of these technologies all of the time and it doesn’t have to be these specific ones to build your platform. What is more important is the concept of a data platform and hopefully this series has introduced you to some areas you may not have considered previously and will help you design a platform to get the very best from your data assets.

If you have any questions, please leave a comment on the site, or contact me on twitter @techstringy or LinkedIn

If you’ve missed any of the series head back to the introduction where you’ll find links to all of the parts of the series.

Thanks for reading.

Taking a grown-up look at cloud – Matt Watts – Ep77

Cloud is not new, I don’t think that’s news to anyone, many of us have deployed a cloud solution, be it a SaaS platform, some public cloud infrastructure or some VM’s for test and dev, cloud continues to play a major part in IT strategy for an ever-increasing amount of businesses.

However, this move to cloud has not come without us learning an awful lot on the way. We’ve probably all heard of, or maybe even been involved with, cloud deployments that have not gone as we expected, the technology hasn’t given us what we want, the commercials didn’t stand up to our calculations, or it just wouldn’t work in the way our on-premises platform did. Many of the issues that have led to those poor cloud experiences have been driven by an “immaturity” to our approach, often too quick to dictate a cloud first strategy, regardless of whether cloud is, in reality, the way to go.

Is our approach to cloud beginning to change? have we got, or do we need to consider our cloud strategy a little differently?

That’s the question we ask on this weeks podcast, an episode inspired by a fantastic article written by my guest Matt Watts, Director of Technology and Strategy, EMEA at NetApp. In the article Matt posed the question Are you Cloud First! or Cloud First? And the difference a bit of punctuation can make, you can read the article here.

I thought the topic he covered in the article and the question he raised were worthy of further investigation and that’s what we do on this weeks show.

During the show we discuss the article in depth, we start out looking at what drove Matt to write the article and the importance of understanding the difference between a strategy and a mandate. We also look at examples of mistakes that people originally made that have meant we’ve needed to start to change our approach.

We talk about the issues that are created by taking on-prem solutions and “dumping” them “as is” into the cloud without asking the question “is there any value in doing this?” and how this drives bad practice in cloud adoption. We also coin the phrase “there is no zealot like a technology zealot!”.

We also explore the idea that cloud adoption isn’t about cost savings, so if it’s not that, why do we want to adopt cloud?

We wrap up looking at examples of building a more mature cloud strategy and how this has worked well, Matt shares some examples of how NetApp’s own internal cloud maturity has driven their own internal decision making. Matt’s final thought is how, without an appropriate and mature cloud strategy, you run the risk building yourself a whole new set of silo’s and limitations.

Matt, as always, shares some fascinating insight into cloud strategy. To find out more from Matt you can check out his other blogs on his watts-innovating site. You can also follow Matt on twitter @mtjwatts.

Next week we get an update on the innovations and developments in VMware Cloud on AWS, until then, thanks for listening.